In The News

Meglos

HAVE A NECTARINE, GONK
Her Madge has boxsets of Doctor Who at at least one palace, so she can't be all bad.

Speaking of which, the lovely Jenna Coleman was on ABC today as Queen Victoria.
 

kxk

SAPIOSEXUAL
Oh she expected plenty

The Uni was ordered to remove speed bumps and roundabouts

it sounds to me like you are a bit intimidated by a strong woman such as the queen, kxk. her strength in her nation's time of trouble and heartache has been inspirational. Her strength has shone through and she has been a shining light in moments of darkness.
LOL
You are funny. The Queen is piss weak.
All of her kids are rather unpleasant and feckless.......it took Di's dna to produce anyone likeable or useful
 

kxk

SAPIOSEXUAL
Her Madge has boxsets of Doctor Who at at least one palace, so she can't be all bad.

Speaking of which, the lovely Jenna Coleman was on ABC today as Queen Victoria.
Oh I love the Victoria series......how gorgeous were Albert's Chrissie decorations and trees, and oh how sad is the lovely brother of Bertie's story
 

kxk

SAPIOSEXUAL
PILL TESTING........JUST DO IT

Since governments across Australia are failing us and our kids.......here is useful info, you can do your own testing = legal



Colour change drug tests could save Aussie lives
As an epidemic sweeps Australia, experts say this simple colour change test could be the ‘interim measure’ we need to save lives.

Australian experts are now recommending drug users invest in a legal, DIY, colour change drug test, known as a reagent kit, to analyse their drugs before consumption.

The warning comes after the summer festival season saw a string of drug overdoses and fatalities, sparking a bitter fight to implement pill-testing services at all events.

As an “interim measure”, universities and advocacy groups have begun handing out reagent pill testing kits to students and festival goers.

The SSDP chapter at The University of Melbourne offers free packs which include the test kit and safety information.

Students at Edith Cowan University, in Western Australia, are also provided with pill testing kits, free of charge.

ECU senior lecturer in addiction Stephen Bright said while the university doesn’t condone its students taking drugs, they are concerned with their wellbeing.

“We expect that some students will take drugs, so until we have sophisticated methods of pill testing available at festival settings, offering the reagent kit is the next best option,” Dr Bright said.


REAGENT KITS

These kits come with a glass vial containing a ‘reagent’ chemical that reacts with small samples of a drug by changing colour.

The coloured drug is then matched to a colour chart, which reveals the purity or cut of a drug.

This is a single use test and can be found in select tobacconists and other stores around Australia and are perfectly legal to purchase.

But Dr Bright warned users to test their drugs with “multiple kits”, as the test is not a substitute for laboratory-grade analysis equipment.

“This is rudimentary at best, but far better than blindly swallowing tablets,” Dr Bright said.

“Using a reagent test is better than nothing and we all know the safest way to avoid harm is not to take ecstasy at all”.

Dr Bright also said the government’s ‘Just Say No’ message is “just not working”, given the prevalence of ecstasy use hasn’t changed in more than two decades.

He urged the government to take an alternative approach in order to save young lives.

“Ecstasy in Australia is one of the most dangerous in the world and the chemicals going in with this drug are becoming more dangerous as well,” he said.

“In the past few years, nearly 500 new drugs have been identified, so the stakes have never been higher.”

Former Australian Federal Police commissioner Mick Palmer is also lending his voice to the cause, publicly calling for the government to take pill testing seriously.

In an opinion piece published in the Sydney Morning Herald this month, Mr Palmer said a government that refuses to discuss or even consider pill testing was “difficult, almost impossible, to understand”.

“A clear majority want to reduce the harm at festivals and get pill testing pilots up all over the country,” Mr Palmer wrote.

“Wouldn’t everyone want to do this?”

He slammed politicians for being ‘ill-informed’ and ‘self-serving’ through the pill testing debate, calling instead on them to put their greed aside.

“Surely there is only one priority here and that is to try any initiative that may serve to reduce the likelihood of harm and save lives. Surely this is more important than winning an election.”

https://www.news.com.au/technology/...s/news-story/c3a8a465066e527fc6ff03d439d051c1


................................
I found all of this helpful and interesting, I have youngsters ........who have pill testing as their PRIMARY POLITICAL ISSUE

More info here from a law reform perspective, a student driven group....
http://ssdp.org.au/blog-post/ssdp-australia-position-statement-pill-testing/
 

kxk

SAPIOSEXUAL
Four-letter word a flaw in anti-pill testing argument
When it comes to pill-testing in Australia, there’s one four-letter word we keep using to make our argument. But it’s a blatant lie.

When it comes to pill testing in Australia, opponents keep sharing a four-letter lie: That we’re wrongfully teaching young people drug use is “safe”.

But research, drug experts and case studies from around the world show this a blatant misrepresentation of how the program actually works.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian has again rejected calls for pill testing after a teenage girl died from a suspected drug overdose at a Sydney music festival.

Alex Ross-King, 19, was one of 11 people rushed to hospital from the FOMO music festival in Parramatta this weekend.

Police are still waiting on the toxicology results, but it’s believed the teenager ingested MDMA at the festival.

It marks the fifth death of its kind in NSW in just four months, prompting a national debate about the effectiveness of pill-testing — a harm minimisation initiative where people can get their drugs tested and ask questions about the effects of different substances.

The NSW Premier’s response to the spate of deaths has been to repeatedly implore young people not to take drugs.

She opposes the introduction of pill-testing, which has been successfully trialled around the world, and insists it would not prevent tragic cases like Ms Ross-King’s.

This morning, Ms Berejiklian told Sunrise host David Koch: “Pill-testing doesn’t deal with overdoses. Pill-testing doesn’t say to one person, ‘This is gonna kill you’, whereas to someone else it might be safe.”

In an opinion piece earlier this month, NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro made a similar statement: “Young people have always experimented, but how many others might be tempted to dabble in drugs if NSW Labor is telling them their pill is ‘safe’?”

“Safe”. Pill-testing opponents repeatedly use this four-letter word to justify their stance, saying it would be unethical to tell young people it’s “safe” to consume drugs simply because a testing kit has determined the substance is pure.

But it’s simply untrue. Harm reduction workers will never, ever tell a person it is “safe” to take drugs, regardless of the test results, according to drug experts.

According to Edith Cowan University addiction expert Stephen Bright, pill-testing services are as much about “opportunistic intervention” and face-to-face education as they are about testing chemicals.

“One of the biggest misconceptions around pill-testing is that it will portray taking drugs as safe,” Dr Bright told news.com.au. “Harm reduction workers always say there is no safe level of drug consumption. It’s an opportunity to educate people on drugs — people who may not have seen such education in their schools, for example.”

He said the brief intervention component was crucial, and that there were several cases in which people who were thinking about taking ecstasy for the first time — and whose pills yielded a pure result — actually changed their mind after speaking with an on-site expert.


“We know there’s concern that pill-testing sites will endorse drug use, but it actually does the absolute opposite,” said Dr Bright. “Young people know using drugs is risky. We have research that demonstrates this. We also have research that shows young people are trying to find out what’s in their pills.

“When you walk into a festival and you see there’s a pill-testing service with information about different kinds of drugs on the market, it makes the risk real — it turns the perception of risk into real risk.”

The NSW Premier’s response to the spate of deaths has been to repeatedly implore young people not to take drugs.

She opposes the introduction of pill-testing, which has been successfully trialled around the world, and insists it would not prevent tragic cases like Ms Ross-King’s.

This morning, Ms Berejiklian told Sunrise host David Koch: “Pill-testing doesn’t deal with overdoses. Pill-testing doesn’t say to one person, ‘This is gonna kill you’, whereas to someone else it might be safe.”

In an opinion piece earlier this month, NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro made a similar statement: “Young people have always experimented, but how many others might be tempted to dabble in drugs if NSW Labor is telling them their pill is ‘safe’?”

“Safe”. Pill-testing opponents repeatedly use this four-letter word to justify their stance, saying it would be unethical to tell young people it’s “safe” to consume drugs simply because a testing kit has determined the substance is pure.

But it’s simply untrue. Harm reduction workers will never, ever tell a person it is “safe” to take drugs, regardless of the test results, according to drug experts.

According to Edith Cowan University addiction expert Stephen Bright, pill-testing services are as much about “opportunistic intervention” and face-to-face education as they are about testing chemicals.

“One of the biggest misconceptions around pill-testing is that it will portray taking drugs as safe,” Dr Bright told news.com.au. “Harm reduction workers always say there is no safe level of drug consumption. It’s an opportunity to educate people on drugs — people who may not have seen such education in their schools, for example.”

He said the brief intervention component was crucial, and that there were several cases in which people who were thinking about taking ecstasy for the first time — and whose pills yielded a pure result — actually changed their mind after speaking with an on-site expert.

“We know there’s concern that pill-testing sites will endorse drug use, but it actually does the absolute opposite,” said Dr Bright. “Young people know using drugs is risky. We have research that demonstrates this. We also have research that shows young people are trying to find out what’s in their pills.

“When you walk into a festival and you see there’s a pill-testing service with information about different kinds of drugs on the market, it makes the risk real — it turns the perception of risk into real risk.”

Simply telling young people not to take drugs, as is Ms Berejiklian’s strategy, does not work. The fact that these tragedies continue to occur proves this.

Studies have found Australians are among the world’s leading consumers of ecstasy, with a 2016 AIHW report finding that 2.1 million — or 10.9 per cent — of Australians aged 14 and over have used the drug at least once.

Ms Berejiklian argued pill-testing doesn’t help when it comes to overdosing on pure MDMA, and that it gives young people a “false sense of security” if their capsule or tablet is found to be free of other substances.

But again, experts dispute this. According to Dr Bright, pill testing can also determine the purity of drugs, which can help young people make more informed decisions and prevent festival deaths.

At Canberra’s Groovin’ The Moo festival last April, for example, where pill-testing was first trialled in Australia, harm reduction workers identified several pills and capsules with potent levels of MDMA.

“Through that, if people were still going to take the drugs, we could tell them to take only half the amount a time, or not to double-drop (take two pills at once),” said Dr Bright. “This can reduce the potential for harm and death by broadcasting it through channels at the festival.”

In some cases, the trial found lethal substances which were disposed of immediately.

David Caldicott, an emergency doctor who led the Canberra trial, said users were never assured it’s okay to take illicit substances.

“When a person first enters the pill testing area, they are met by a ’harm reduction worker’. This person explains the pill testing process and advises the patron that there is no safe level of drug consumption,” Mr Caldicott told the ABC.

“You will not be told at any stage that your drug is safe.”

Dr Bright also set up a covert pill-testing station at a Victorian music festival in 2017. He said most people disposed of their drugs after tests determined they were potentially harmful.

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/h...t/news-story/c29f16b2865ab7f95254410ab517395a
 
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