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reepbot

BUILD THAT WALL!
Go outside tonight...because you may get to see this!



A PHENOMENAL space event is headed for earth and could hit Australia tonight.

Aurora australis is just like the northern lights that mainly occur around Sweden and Iceland, but it instead lurks in the southern hemisphere.

It’s mostly visible from Antarctica, New Zealand and Tasmania, but those at the bottom of Victoria and South Australia may catch a glimpse as the lights move towards the country.



Auroras are best seen at night between 11pm and 2am.

It is more visible when there is a low level of moonlight and you’re away from cities.

The further south you go, the more likely it is you will spot a spectacular aurora.

....this kind of solar activity peaked around every 11 years while the sun was in the solar maximum part of its cycle.

It’s as if the sun has a heart that beats every 11 years, setting free the solar wind.

http://www.news.com.au/technology/s...t/news-story/1bc470d1186ce8799d778d995bfffd61

Isn't there meant to be a supermoon tonight? Some people have been speculating that is what caused the tsunami and earthquakes in New Zealand?
 

kxk

SAPIOSEXUAL
Melbourne - just gets better every day, look at this genius idea, i want to have a party there

This is literally the best idea ever':
The movie theatre designed just for KIDS - complete with a giant slide entrance, playground area and special snacks
  • The very first cinema designed just for kids has been opened in Melbourne
  • It features a Mega Block wall, a giant Scrabble board and a huge slide
  • 'This is literally the best idea ever!' one enthusiastic mother said





In addition to the Mega Block wall and the large slide running the length of the theatre, it also features an interactive play area packed with toys.
Instead of scrambling to make the movie just in time, parents are encouraged to arrive up to an hour early so their children can make the most of the area.
There is also modified lighting and volume levels, intermission and a specialised kids' menu with milkshakes and fruit snacks.

Already the cinema is proving popular with parents, with many taking to social media to voice their approval.

'Perfect way to spend our Thursday night - at the premier of Trolls at the first ever kids' cinema,' one mother wrote on Instagram.

'Yes. That is a giant slide going down the entire length of the cinema,' another enthused.

'And yes Bobby has been up and down at least 48 times so far,' she added.

'All whilst I'm sitting, feet up, in a squishy recliner. This is literally the best damn idea ever.'



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/a...-children-opened-Melbourne.html#ixzz4Rv0QYddJ
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
 

reepbot

BUILD THAT WALL!
Melbourne - just gets better every day, look at this genius idea, i want to have a party there

This is literally the best idea ever':
The movie theatre designed just for KIDS - complete with a giant slide entrance, playground area and special snacks
  • The very first cinema designed just for kids has been opened in Melbourne
  • It features a Mega Block wall, a giant Scrabble board and a huge slide
  • 'This is literally the best idea ever!' one enthusiastic mother said





In addition to the Mega Block wall and the large slide running the length of the theatre, it also features an interactive play area packed with toys.
Instead of scrambling to make the movie just in time, parents are encouraged to arrive up to an hour early so their children can make the most of the area.
There is also modified lighting and volume levels, intermission and a specialised kids' menu with milkshakes and fruit snacks.

Already the cinema is proving popular with parents, with many taking to social media to voice their approval.

'Perfect way to spend our Thursday night - at the premier of Trolls at the first ever kids' cinema,' one mother wrote on Instagram.

'Yes. That is a giant slide going down the entire length of the cinema,' another enthused.

'And yes Bobby has been up and down at least 48 times so far,' she added.

'All whilst I'm sitting, feet up, in a squishy recliner. This is literally the best damn idea ever.'



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/a...-children-opened-Melbourne.html#ixzz4Rv0QYddJ
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

oh that does look quite exciting.[DOUBLEPOST=1482216681][/DOUBLEPOST]here are some other themed home theaters/cinemas



 

up_all_night

Well-Known Member
Awesome site donor
Go to the Galapagos is you haven't. It's amazing!!! I didn't see snakes though but I saw amazing things.

Going there is one of those things that ruined my life. I just look at pictures and videos and I cry inside because nothing else in my life is as amazing as what I saw and did there. Extended to 6 months of travelling in South and Central America.

One of the pictures I took.
 
Last edited:

reepbot

BUILD THAT WALL!
Go to the Galapagos is you haven't. It's amazing!!! I didn't see snakes though but I saw amazing things.

Going there is one of those things that ruined my life. I just look at pictures and videos and I cry inside because nothing else in my life is as amazing as what I saw and did there. Extended to 6 months of travelling in South and Central America.

One of the pictures I took.
I shall go there one day.
 

Mr Stickyfingers

an old fart that rants at times...
Awesome site donor
...not much to say except "wow!"... cheers.

Saturn's North Pole Looks Like Watercolor Painting Brushwork: Image Captured By NASA's Cassini Spacecraft

 

Mr Stickyfingers

an old fart that rants at times...
Awesome site donor
...I would never had thought that ants would do this... colour me intrigued... on this link below... cheers.

http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sc...e-their-wounded-comrades-20170412-gvk0st.html

Ants march into battle and rescue their wounded comrades


Much like human soldiers in combat, members of a large, black, termite-eating ant species found in sub-Saharan Africa march in formation into battle and afterward retrieve wounded comrades and carry them back home to recover.

Scientists described the unique rescue behaviour of the African Matabele ants, called Megaponera analis, after observing them in Ivory Coast's Comoé National Park, but did not ascribe charitable motives to the insects.



Ants: Nature's little rescuers. Photo: Supplied
"This is not an altruistic behaviour," said entomologist Erik Frank of the University of Würzburg in Germany, who led the research published in the journal Science Advances.

"The ants do not help the injured out of the goodness of their hearts. There is a clear benefit for the colony: these injured ants are able to participate again in future raids and remain a functioning member of the colony."

The ants, which get up to almost 2cm long, specialise in hunting termites and use a distinctive raiding strategy.

Scouts leave the nest in search of termite-foraging sites, then recruit up to 500 nest mates and lead them to the termites in a column formation. Ants injured while fighting with termites, sometimes losing limbs or becoming disabled when termites cling to them, excrete pheromone chemicals from their bodies to signal comrades for help.


Uninjured ants then hoist up the wounded and carry them, as well as the dead termites, back to the nest in the same column formation, sometimes as far as about 50 metres. Once back at the nest, other ants remove termites that may be grasping the injured ants. Ants that lost one or two of their six legs are able to adapt their locomotion, often regaining running speeds similar to a healthy ant within 24 hours.

Nearly all the rescued ants participated in subsequent raids, sometimes less than an hour after being injured.

Frank said he was surprised to find this behaviour in an invertebrate species.

"It first sounded illogical to me why they should evolve this type of helping behaviour," Frank said. "After a closer look, we realised that the good of the individual, saving the injured, can also be for the good of the colony, and that individuals can be very valuable in ants."

In addition to primates such as apes and monkeys, rescue behaviour has been seen in certain other mammals including elephants, rats and dolphins, Frank said.
 
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