What're You Drinking?

February

Active Member
#21
I'm having a bit of a decadent moment this afternoon/ evening. My partner has just gone out with the guys, so I always think time alone should be made special time!
I was given a bottle of Louis Roederer French champagne for Christmas by one of my clients. Usually I share, but I've just opened it to watch the first 4 eps of MAFS 😃
Bring it on!
 

kxk

SAPIOSEXUAL
#22
If you get food fish and chips it should be gummy shark = proper flake

But lots of fishy places use a cheaper baby shark

Gummy shark: a unique shark fishery
Gummy shark caught in southern Australian waters is considered a sustainable choice by the federal government. The biology of the gummy shark is different from familiar apex predators like the great white, tiger and hammerhead sharks. It is relatively fast growing, has a high reproductive rate and feeds on invertebrates in the sand and mud.
The commercial fishery only catches young adults. It employs a net mesh size that allows smaller fish to swim through and larger mature individuals to bounce off. The fishery is controlled under a total allowable catch which is set at biologically conservative levels, currently at 1836 tonnes each year.



So back at the fish shop the local gummy shark sounds like a sustainable option. But can you trust the label?
‘Fake’ flake on the menu
According to the Australian Fish Names Standard, only two species should be sold as flake: the gummy shark and a related species from NZ, rig. So already the waters are muddied, but surely fish labelled local gummy should be a safe bet for sustainability?
The Australian Fish Names Standard is voluntary and country of origin labelling regulations only apply to raw and frozen product- not cooked meals in cafes, restaurants and fish and chip shops. This means your ‘flake’ might not be gummy shark, or from a local fishery.

........while it is an offence to describe food dishonestly, the reality in the case of flake is that it can be substituted for any other shark species. A Greenpeace investigation using DNA analysis of samples of flake sold in Melbourne fish and chip shops found that a third were actually school shark, probably imported.

School shark = not sustainable, considered to be over fished
I like to keep eating sustainable ........my ex was a fisherman, he would go to town on some fish shops doing suss stuff
I miss fresh caught that morning fish.......and some fish nobody but fishermen get......do not miss fishy smelling mate


Just bought some from my local market. About $33k, sounds expensive but it is light, my piece was only $5
 

kxk

SAPIOSEXUAL
#23
I'm having a bit of a decadent moment this afternoon/ evening. My partner has just gone out with the guys, so I always think time alone should be made special time!
I was given a bottle of Louis Roederer French champagne for Christmas by one of my clients. Usually I share, but I've just opened it to watch the first 4 eps of MAFS 😃
Bring it on!
You will need to scoff the entire bottle to get through MAFS
I tried.......got through 1 and a half episodes......................................it is extremely boring, I think you just need episode 1, plus adds to follow this crap
 

February

Active Member
#24
You will need to scoff the entire bottle to get through MAFS
I tried.......got through 1 and a half episodes......................................it is extremely boring, I think you just need episode 1, plus adds to follow this crap
I'm half way through both as I type! The bubbles are probably making it more bearable!
I get sucked into it, but realize they'll probably all go their separate ways in the end.
I keep hoping. Thank goodness for the remote control - and bubbles!
 
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February

Active Member
#25
If you get food fish and chips it should be gummy shark = proper flake

But lots of fishy places use a cheaper baby shark

Gummy shark: a unique shark fishery
Gummy shark caught in southern Australian waters is considered a sustainable choice by the federal government. The biology of the gummy shark is different from familiar apex predators like the great white, tiger and hammerhead sharks. It is relatively fast growing, has a high reproductive rate and feeds on invertebrates in the sand and mud.
The commercial fishery only catches young adults. It employs a net mesh size that allows smaller fish to swim through and larger mature individuals to bounce off. The fishery is controlled under a total allowable catch which is set at biologically conservative levels, currently at 1836 tonnes each year.



So back at the fish shop the local gummy shark sounds like a sustainable option. But can you trust the label?
‘Fake’ flake on the menu
According to the Australian Fish Names Standard, only two species should be sold as flake: the gummy shark and a related species from NZ, rig. So already the waters are muddied, but surely fish labelled local gummy should be a safe bet for sustainability?
The Australian Fish Names Standard is voluntary and country of origin labelling regulations only apply to raw and frozen product- not cooked meals in cafes, restaurants and fish and chip shops. This means your ‘flake’ might not be gummy shark, or from a local fishery
So Flake is Gummy Shark? I've had Flake before.
 

February

Active Member
#27
Ooh I was just looking at the time. A bit early for a nightcap but my first appointment is at 7am tomorrow morning. So early night. Just thought I'd explain that one away ☺
 
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